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that was abandoned, and there's a lot of other religion, the left turned against religion. when it was half of the movement's inspiration and half of the dr. king's magnificent formula of equal souls, equal votes, a foot in the scriptures one foot in the constitution, and the next thing you know, people are turning against the spiritual base of democracy. we misrememberedded the civil war for a century. when i grew up in atlanta; the textbook said it had nothing to do with slavery. we got a lot of sentimental gone with the wind, and to this day, textbooks in history refer to the political movement that overthrew the reconstruction governments after the civil war and restored white supremacy in the south paving the way for segregation, referred, the textbooks refer to the movement as the redeemers. the redeemers redeemed the south. the religious word that in reality was accomplished by terror. terrorism as much as the terrorism that plaged the world that we're attuned to when it's not among us. it turned race -- race has the power of turning our sense of perception upside down. that's the te
then that they get bitter king to guns or religion or antipathy towards people who aren't like them, or anti-immigrant sentiment or antitrade center. as with a toy to explain their frustrations. >> the comments became a big part of the discussion on the left-right culture war. republicans were happy to publicize his comments, but these days they're terrified they might be losing the culture wars on some front, and they may well will. let's look at the grounds on gay marriage. once unthinkable, nine states and the district of columbia have legalized same-sex marriage either by court degree, legislative action or actual popular vote. and now illinois, delaware, and hawaii are also considering legalizing gay marriage, same-sex marriage. and the rights retreat on cultural issues extends to other areas as well. i'm joined by lauren ashburn, found over the daily download and a contributor to the daily beast. oftenly confused with hillary rodham clinton. but not politically. let me talk about this, because you're on the front all the time fighting for same-sex rights and gay rights generally. isn't
study law or medicine or religion. that was about all. thomas jefferson had a vision. he believed the american people needed a public place to learn the diversity of disciplines, studies of science and at space, 4, form a common philosophy. -- flora, fauna, philosophy. he built this university in the image of 20 called the illimitable freedom of the human mind. today those of you will study here and teach here along with the taxpayers contributors, and parents who believe in your potential, you are all investing in mr. jefferson's vision. think for a moment about what that means. why do you spend many days and the dollars it takes to earn an education here or anywhere? why did jefferson what this institution to remain public and accessible, not just to virginians but as a destination from everywhere? i know that he was not thinking just about your getting a degree and a job. it was about something more. jefferson believed we could not be a strong country without investing in the kind of education that empowers us to be good citizens. that is why founding this university is among t
fellow religion, i want our people out of there. that is not right. i come over to our country and try to kill us. we need to stay over there and fight for our freedom. host: you bring up interesting points. basic idea we have in this country is that we get into wars, but we very rapidly lose the ability to support those wars, political perspective. we saw what happened in vietnam. if desert storm last longer, we would have seen the same thing there. we know what happened with iraqi freedom. you're looking at a nation that can go in, with a superb military capability, which her daughter is a part of, and it can make a lot of differences, but the problem you have is that you have a political situation where we cannot sustain a long- term deployment, 12-13 years in afghanistan over the long term. it has become america's longest war. economically, you look at how that works. the big problem that i have with the drawdown is perhaps related to what your saying -- you have to be very careful about what to tell the enemy. you have to have a negotiating position that gets you from the strength
religious liberty. he wants to define the first amendment, free exercise of religion clause to one hour a week. that's what he wants to do. he is not our friend. >> stephanie: wow. >> that's treason. >> stephanie: i was going to say that sounded a little treasony. the president of the united states is our enemy? the enemy? that's dangerous talk, isn't it? maybe the secret service needs to borrow the giant cartoon paw. [knock at door] >> isn't that the sound the cat made when he was out for the night? >> stephanie: right. >> then the cat will stay out for the night. [knock at door] >> stephanie: that concludes right-wing world. thank god. [ applause ] >> you didn't like that? >> stephanie: no. >> started to turn. >> stephanie: 17 minutes after the hour. you know, we talk about carbonite. how great was that letter i just read the other day. an item t. specialist, someone lost everything in her computer. they called the data recovery company. it will cost $2,000. what could she have done? carbonite for only $59 for the entire year? now everybody in the office has carbonite. you have all of
. people in great distress either find religion or the courts. [laughter] that is okay. we need a road map. what we are really out lying is an ongoing mission. our ideal on both sides, because we are open to all and have a level playing field. the road maps, the clarity of language, and information flows to the ultimate consumers, it is ideal. i love the fact that at the beginning of the creation, there was the thought that information flow passivity in a certain way for a certain population. i love the fact there is one for seniors because information is channeled differently for different priorities in different times. it must reflect our diversity and the delivery of regulation. we are here for the seniors. i see so many coming to the court room see how important that is. >> i wanted to move on to discussing the short term. short-term credit ends up being a death trap for a lot of consumers in a harmful way. that brings us the issue of loans and we have seen the effects. i want to bring in dawn to the conversation. there you are. you have done a lot of work in texas around this issue. m
, such as, for example, religion or os sa fied theorys that aren't based on what actually works but based on a religious ooh ooh ooh fervor. this is not the party of burke. i was teaching burke at columbia this week. my key question to the students is, you've read burke, conservatism. you thought you weren't going to like him. yet most of you hate republicans. what's the difference? >> wait a second -- >> i'm a great admirer of burke. i understand what you're talking about. i think part of the modern challenges of the movement in america was forged in the 1960s, before the great society. so there needs to be a reassessment of how you apply conservative principles to the 21st century. that philosophical is ongoing on. >> the author of the great director of mind. if he's watching, he's losing his mind because i think the whole persuasion of burke, burke is a radical calling your revolution. monar monarchist revolution. his whole point we liberals consider a have this argument, it was good conservatism back in the day. >> burke was in dialogue -- >> exactly, the ones who are no longer in pow
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)